Blog Archives

Thank Goodness She Doesn’t Have Mrs. Fluck for First Grade

Shelly’s daughter loves her first grade teacher, so she drew a picture and shared it with her.

Her teacher shared the picture with Shelly.

Shelly shared it with Stuff Kids Write.

Thanks, Shelly.

Thanks, Shelly’s daughter.

Thanks, Shelly’s daughter’s teacher, Mrs. Schmidt.

Sharing truly is the sh*t.

*******

If you’d also like to be the sh*t, share with us! Email your image to mcfadden.chase@gmail.com or leanneshirtliffe@gmail.com. Pieces can be posted with credit or anonymously, and if you have a personal blog/site you’d like us to link to, we will!

(PS – If you happen to be reading this and your name actually is Mrs. Fluck and you’re a first grade teacher, PLEASE! PLEASE! PLEASE! send us just a handful of  what must be the thousands of student papers you’ve collected over the years with your name misspelled. Thanks!)

How Does One Help With Those?

 

A new school year provides lots of opportunities to spot awesome stuff that kids write!

If you find something humorous hanging on the wall when visiting your children’s schools, snap a pic with your phone and pass it along to us.

And please tell friends and teachers about Stuff Kids Write!

Submissions can be sent to either leanneshirtliffe@gmail.com or mcfadden.chase@gmail.com.

Thanks!

A Dime A Dozen = A Year’s Worth of Tutoring

Sahaana is a small businesswoman.

Literally. She’s 7.

And she’s saving up to buy her own iPad. So, in hopes of drumming up a little business among attending parents, she advertised her tutoring services during her brother’s birthday party.

Based on her monthly fee and the rate of inflation, Sahaana should be able to purchase her own iPad somewhere around the year 2032.

Sahaana, don’t sell yourself short, even if you are short.

Better grades are worth more than a dime! Add some zeros to that figure and bump the decimal to the right, girl!

*****

Thanks to Vasu and Priya, Sahaana’s parents, for sharing their daughter’s awesome entrepreneurial spirit.

Hos Your But Crack?

Tracey and her daughter were outside playing.

Tracey fell down and landed on her rear end.

Tracey’s daughter thought it was hysterical.

Later, 5-year-old Hannah wrote a note to check on the status of her mom’s posterior.

Thanks for sharing, Tracey. We hope your but crack is doing bater.

Pizza Don’t Have No Flees

Written by SC, age 7.

Easter is the Coolest Holiday

Things that are cool about Easter when you’re a kid:

1. Putting a beatdown on those other fool suckas in the egg hunt

2. Decapitating chocolate bunnies

3. Scattering that plastic grass crap in your basket all over the house

4. Sucking the filling out of Cadbury eggs

5. Your brother Mike

Brad from CampusLIVE snapped this pic. The letter hangs on his friend Noelle’s parents’ fridge. She wrote it to her brother Mike when she was a kid.

Hope you and yours have the coolest of Easters.

A Butt-Kicking for the Ages

Brian wrote this story when he was a kid. His parents kept it. You’ll understand why. They had to be incredibly proud.

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The moral of this story?

Talking mice are inherently wise. If one ever offers you advice, take it.

Just don’t bend over to take it.

Especially if you’re naked.

No I Amn’t!

My 8-year-old took time from his busy morning routine of slurping cereal and moving as slowly as humanly possible to print this label for his 6-year-old nemesis brother last week as they ate breakfast.

Not surprising. Siblings fight. It’s natural. Kids even write poems about it.

What was surprising — at least to the two combatants —  is how much their dad enjoyed it. So I thought I’d share.

Your welcme.

When Your 7-year-old Is As Melodramatic As a Teen

I wrote schmaltzy, over-the-top poetry as a teenager. I still have some of it. Vague notions of what it would be like to be loved by a boy, or at least to find one who wasn’t afraid of me, filled my notebook.

Most of this over-emoting passed in Junior High, thankfully. In Senior High, I seemed to hit my stride (almost literally on the basketball court), replacing many of my obsessive thoughts about boys with other obsessions, like my free throw and turnover percentages.

Now, decades later, I think I’ve passed on my early teen propensity for melodrama to my daughter, Vivian, who frequently expresses all of her emotions in writing. Recently, I annoyed my Grade Two cutie once again. I can’t remember what I wouldn’t do for her (perhaps pack her school bag or let her have a third cheese stick). Suffice it to say I was ignoring her request, like many an online parent.

Snubbed, Vivian threw open her craft drawer, yanked out a sheet of paper, and scrawled her thoughts quickly. She then slammed her note on the table beside me and strode away.

I had come face-to-face with a teenager, possibly my younger self.

I closed my computer and read the note below:

As a parent, not only have I become my mother, but I’ve also become my daughter.

Send help, most likely to Vivian, who’s stuck with me.

*

Please help me to interpret Vivian’s usage of “Uh-ta” in the note.  Funny responses are welcome.

No Wonder My Dreams Weren’t Coming True: I’d Been Using Shredded Cucumber!

Amanda Bast, who’s sent in great stuff before, submitted this piece. She explains:

A little girl handed me this gem after teaching her grade 4 class. She offered no explanation, just handed it over and refused to explain it.

It reads:

Secret Recipe for your wish to come true

-cat hair

-dog hair          (10 wishes for 10 drops)

-yogurt

-ripped up paper

-cucumber (sliced)

-MIX

-Stir

-Pour over head

-think hard

-Done

Seems easy enough. And it’s easy to smile when you read Amanda’s stuff, too. Go check out her site by clicking here. Thanks, Amanda!