Category Archives: Notes

Take My Word For It: This Book Is Asam!

Seven-year-old Sage wrote a book.

We’ll let her tell you all about it:

sage.story

A long, fun, weird story about a girl? What’s not to love about that!

Pretty savvy strategy by Sage giving us the CliffNotes version of her novel: just enough of a  tease to get us to buy the to-be-published bestseller or go watch the film adaptation, but not so much as to spoil it for us.

Asam.

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Thanks to Sage’s mother, Toni, for sharing with Stuff Kids Write. If you have humorous kids’ writing you’re willing to share with our readers, please send it either mcfadden.chase@gmail.com or leanneshirtliffe@gmail.com. Thanks!

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Telling on Daddy

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Send us the funny things your kids (or other people’s kids) write! Email a jpeg image to mcfadden.chase@gmail.com or leanneshirtliffe@gmail.com. Pieces can be posted with credit or anonymously, and if you have a personal blog/site you’d like us to link to, we will.

Thou Shalt Not Steal (or I’ll Tell Mom!)

Sometimes, you just have to take a stand against the tyranny of a sister.

And if that doesn’t work, write a note to your mom telling on her.

Thanks to Megan for sharing this detailed incident report from her son.

The Sun’ll Come Out… Tomorrow?

We all have ’em…

But few of us ever have the foresight to post a sign on our bedroom door alerting others to the fact it’s the worst day of life. By far.

And including a hand-drawn emoticon to further drive home the point and alert potential non-readers to the fact? Next-level stuff, for sure.

Thanks to Anji for sharing her son’s sun’s status update.

If he’d drawn a “Like” box, we’d have checked it for sure.

Hos Your But Crack?

Tracey and her daughter were outside playing.

Tracey fell down and landed on her rear end.

Tracey’s daughter thought it was hysterical.

Later, 5-year-old Hannah wrote a note to check on the status of her mom’s posterior.

Thanks for sharing, Tracey. We hope your but crack is doing bater.

To Believe or Not To Believe a 6-Year-Old

Years ago, when S was six, she desperately wanted to help her older brother. He had hurt himself and S. was insisting on nursing his injuries. Her 11-year-old brother obviously had little faith in her medical skills and wouldn’t let S near him.

So S wrote her big brother a persuasive note.

"Why do you never believe me. I believe you so why do you not believe me. And I love you. From S."

Bless little S, her persuasion techniques, and the effort she took to spell “from.”

Don’t stop believing.

Except that song is now stuck in my head.

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Thanks to S’s mom who submitted this note from her archives. Please go visit her blog at Art Club Blog.

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Please look through your own archives and send submissions of funny stuff that kids write to stuffkidswrite(at)gmail(dot)com.

P.S. – Light a Match or Something!

Jake has a little sister. She’s 10. We think she’s got a terrific sense of humor. Jake may not agree.

Thanks to Vicki for this submission. Check out her blog Where the FuhKaui? Don’t worry: it doesn’t stink.

How To Stop Old People from Going into Your Bedroom

My friend Lisa has 3 daughters within two years of each other. Their household is a busy one. As a family, they do a lot of crazy things together, like going backwoods camping, sleeping in tents in the winter for fun, and  – gasp – doing crafts.

Recently, one of her 8-year-old twins decided to keep her older sister out of her room. She crafted the following note and hung it on her door.

M. does mean it. I know that little puppy in the corner looks innocent, but he could turn on you.

I think I need one of these for my bedroom. Only I might change the “over” to “under.” I mean it. Woof.

When Your 7-year-old Is As Melodramatic As a Teen

I wrote schmaltzy, over-the-top poetry as a teenager. I still have some of it. Vague notions of what it would be like to be loved by a boy, or at least to find one who wasn’t afraid of me, filled my notebook.

Most of this over-emoting passed in Junior High, thankfully. In Senior High, I seemed to hit my stride (almost literally on the basketball court), replacing many of my obsessive thoughts about boys with other obsessions, like my free throw and turnover percentages.

Now, decades later, I think I’ve passed on my early teen propensity for melodrama to my daughter, Vivian, who frequently expresses all of her emotions in writing. Recently, I annoyed my Grade Two cutie once again. I can’t remember what I wouldn’t do for her (perhaps pack her school bag or let her have a third cheese stick). Suffice it to say I was ignoring her request, like many an online parent.

Snubbed, Vivian threw open her craft drawer, yanked out a sheet of paper, and scrawled her thoughts quickly. She then slammed her note on the table beside me and strode away.

I had come face-to-face with a teenager, possibly my younger self.

I closed my computer and read the note below:

As a parent, not only have I become my mother, but I’ve also become my daughter.

Send help, most likely to Vivian, who’s stuck with me.

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Please help me to interpret Vivian’s usage of “Uh-ta” in the note.  Funny responses are welcome.

When Your Little Sister Gives You 7 Exclamation Points, You’d Better Recognize

Brin is 6. She left this whiteboard note on her 8-year-old brother’s bed.